The Small Moments


Going through the motions of everyday life can be monotonous, but noticing those small moments makes this journey conspicuously captivating. This is my philosophy.

Male. 23. Single. Californian. Music enthusiast. CPA bound. Banana Slug. Colorblind. Hufflepuff. Airbender. Shiny Chandelure trainer. Not Jewish.


theme by coryjonny
powered by tumblr

Finally got around to playing my Fire Emblem and I gotta say that it was foolish of me that I took this long to start it.

(Source: dwightyoumonkeyslut, via serketbreaker)

goldenheartedrose:

rabbiman:

onthemedia:

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT THE INTERNET FROM THE DISASTROUS DASHCON CONVENTION LAST WEEKEND?
Fandom works precisely because it has no leaders. People feed off one another’s creativity and energy, and you don’t need anyone’s permission to squirrel your own stories away on your Tumblr. They are yours and they are everyone’s. No one’s asking permission, no one’s organizing them beyond a few hashtags, and no one is “responsible” with keeping the fandom running smoothly. 
But to create an event, one that exists in the world, and requires transactions (both socially and monetarily), well, fandom doesn’t necessarily equip one to be able to pull that off. It feels like the DashCon organizers were faced with an event that they willed into being, and then required maintenance, follow-through, and organization. And it fell apart.

I thoroughly read through this article and its links and that is pretty much what I had in mind what would happen. You don’t mix “legal stuff” and “finances” with “literal 13 year olds” or you will end up with a $17,000 ball pit meme.

You realize that the person running the con is in her thirties? That this “Bwahaha run by 13 year olds” thing has nothing to do with the people actually in charge, except if you count the committee heads? But hey let’s make fun of teenage girls. That’s totally fun.

You realize that it takes more than one person to run a con? Not that the “13 year olds” should be blamed for something they had no way of knowing how astronomically hard running a con would be when they haven’t done it before, especially when the leadership of said con tells them that they are in charge of raising their own finances, using their own bank accounts, figuring out the logistics of their events, etc, then said leadership pushing harsher and harsher restrictions of what they can actually do after giving them such lofty hopes and expectations only to pull the rug from right underneath them… With that said, a leadership should be judged as a whole unit as well as its parts, from the admin overlords to the committee heads who somehow made the con even possible. That isn’t to say that responsibility shouldn’t be varied and perhaps more weighted on the supposed “person running the con in her thirties” than the inexperienced and perhaps real victims of the con calamity itself.
This article does encapsulate pretty well that you can’t just will something into being and expect everything to follow through perfectly without backlash or consequences. From the sounds of it, the con admins just shoved everything into being using “literal 13 year olds” (which that phrase should be replaced with people with lack of experience or knowledge of management, what have you) as the shaky foundation of it all. Personally speaking, this wouldn’t have been so bad if there was at least a something to keep them grounded with some semblance of reality considering that this is the first con with little to no starting capital to run it.
From the interpretation of the leadership, it is hard to separate how things were run with how childish and unprofessional these Admins seemed to be. I will admit that it is also hard to tear away the persona of a Tumblrer, someone who is most likely but not always a teenager in school still learning the ways of the world but in the process reblogging every little second of their first world problems and lolcat nonsense and commenting passive aggressively on posts to start a random one off argument that identifies the nonexistent subtle offensive undertone of a comment blatantly summarized and contextualized from its source material while at the same time sharing that same suggestive sarcasm to abridge their own bias and interpretation to achieve a false sense of moral high ground that all too commonly turns into an unsatisfactory release of Napoleonic superiority and unceremoniously ends and is eventually forgotten in the meaningless garbled void that is the internet and, more profoundly significant, life… I also sincerely hope that there weren’t any actual “literal 13 year olds” actually running the show for the sake of their own well being, mentally and financially, as I can imagine that something as built up as this con was not being the perfect event originally envisioned can be a serious blow to the ego. 

goldenheartedrose:

rabbiman:

onthemedia:

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT THE INTERNET FROM THE DISASTROUS DASHCON CONVENTION LAST WEEKEND?

Fandom works precisely because it has no leaders. People feed off one another’s creativity and energy, and you don’t need anyone’s permission to squirrel your own stories away on your Tumblr. They are yours and they are everyone’s. No one’s asking permission, no one’s organizing them beyond a few hashtags, and no one is “responsible” with keeping the fandom running smoothly. 

But to create an event, one that exists in the world, and requires transactions (both socially and monetarily), well, fandom doesn’t necessarily equip one to be able to pull that off. It feels like the DashCon organizers were faced with an event that they willed into being, and then required maintenance, follow-through, and organization. And it fell apart.

I thoroughly read through this article and its links and that is pretty much what I had in mind what would happen.
You don’t mix “legal stuff” and “finances” with “literal 13 year olds” or you will end up with a $17,000 ball pit meme.

You realize that the person running the con is in her thirties? That this “Bwahaha run by 13 year olds” thing has nothing to do with the people actually in charge, except if you count the committee heads? But hey let’s make fun of teenage girls. That’s totally fun.

You realize that it takes more than one person to run a con? Not that the “13 year olds” should be blamed for something they had no way of knowing how astronomically hard running a con would be when they haven’t done it before, especially when the leadership of said con tells them that they are in charge of raising their own finances, using their own bank accounts, figuring out the logistics of their events, etc, then said leadership pushing harsher and harsher restrictions of what they can actually do after giving them such lofty hopes and expectations only to pull the rug from right underneath them… With that said, a leadership should be judged as a whole unit as well as its parts, from the admin overlords to the committee heads who somehow made the con even possible. That isn’t to say that responsibility shouldn’t be varied and perhaps more weighted on the supposed “person running the con in her thirties” than the inexperienced and perhaps real victims of the con calamity itself.

This article does encapsulate pretty well that you can’t just will something into being and expect everything to follow through perfectly without backlash or consequences. From the sounds of it, the con admins just shoved everything into being using “literal 13 year olds” (which that phrase should be replaced with people with lack of experience or knowledge of management, what have you) as the shaky foundation of it all. Personally speaking, this wouldn’t have been so bad if there was at least a something to keep them grounded with some semblance of reality considering that this is the first con with little to no starting capital to run it.

From the interpretation of the leadership, it is hard to separate how things were run with how childish and unprofessional these Admins seemed to be. I will admit that it is also hard to tear away the persona of a Tumblrer, someone who is most likely but not always a teenager in school still learning the ways of the world but in the process reblogging every little second of their first world problems and lolcat nonsense and commenting passive aggressively on posts to start a random one off argument that identifies the nonexistent subtle offensive undertone of a comment blatantly summarized and contextualized from its source material while at the same time sharing that same suggestive sarcasm to abridge their own bias and interpretation to achieve a false sense of moral high ground that all too commonly turns into an unsatisfactory release of Napoleonic superiority and unceremoniously ends and is eventually forgotten in the meaningless garbled void that is the internet and, more profoundly significant, life… I also sincerely hope that there weren’t any actual “literal 13 year olds” actually running the show for the sake of their own well being, mentally and financially, as I can imagine that something as built up as this con was not being the perfect event originally envisioned can be a serious blow to the ego. 

onthemedia:

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT THE INTERNET FROM THE DISASTROUS DASHCON CONVENTION LAST WEEKEND?
Fandom works precisely because it has no leaders. People feed off one another’s creativity and energy, and you don’t need anyone’s permission to squirrel your own stories away on your Tumblr. They are yours and they are everyone’s. No one’s asking permission, no one’s organizing them beyond a few hashtags, and no one is “responsible” with keeping the fandom running smoothly. 
But to create an event, one that exists in the world, and requires transactions (both socially and monetarily), well, fandom doesn’t necessarily equip one to be able to pull that off. It feels like the DashCon organizers were faced with an event that they willed into being, and then required maintenance, follow-through, and organization. And it fell apart.


I thoroughly read through this article and its links and that is pretty much what I had in mind what would happen. You don’t mix “legal stuff” and “finances” with “literal 13 year olds” or you will end up with a $17,000 ball pit meme.

onthemedia:

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT THE INTERNET FROM THE DISASTROUS DASHCON CONVENTION LAST WEEKEND?

Fandom works precisely because it has no leaders. People feed off one another’s creativity and energy, and you don’t need anyone’s permission to squirrel your own stories away on your Tumblr. They are yours and they are everyone’s. No one’s asking permission, no one’s organizing them beyond a few hashtags, and no one is “responsible” with keeping the fandom running smoothly. 

But to create an event, one that exists in the world, and requires transactions (both socially and monetarily), well, fandom doesn’t necessarily equip one to be able to pull that off. It feels like the DashCon organizers were faced with an event that they willed into being, and then required maintenance, follow-through, and organization. And it fell apart.

I thoroughly read through this article and its links and that is pretty much what I had in mind what would happen.
You don’t mix “legal stuff” and “finances” with “literal 13 year olds” or you will end up with a $17,000 ball pit meme.

(via npr)

somethingtrivial said: (it says "fuck the color blind")

Thank you lol you are a kind soul and my eyes are shitake mushrooms

TAYLOR TOOK A PICTURE OF IT AND ADJUSTED THE HUE AND ADDED A FEW FILTERS ON THAT LAST POST I MADE AND I SWEAR TO YOU ALL I CAN ONLY SEE A NUMBER 25, I AM SO PO’D I’M NOT EVEN

Can you tell me what this says???

Can you tell me what this says???

(via anyhoodle)

grawly:

dont even ask just put your mind in a suspension of disbelief and click play

(via serketbreaker)

ihatekingdomhearts:

do you wanna hear a 1 second audio clip of goofy drammatically shouting mulan?? yeah you do

(via disney-garden)

thegreatpotatoking:

This is the single most important invention of 2014. No question about it.

(Source: pedalfar, via somethingtrivial)